Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles

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BIOS uses their VideoRay Pro 3 Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) to assist in the research and conservation of the unique marine environment surrounding the tropical Mid-Atlantic paradise.

BIOS, or the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, counts on their VideoRay Pro 3 Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) to assist in the research and conservation of the unique marine environment surrounding the tropical Mid-Atlantic paradise. Formerly known as The Bermuda Biological Station for Research, the institute was founded in 1903 by scientists from Harvard University, New York University and the Bermuda Natural History Society as a station for research in biology and zoology. Today, scientists and students from around the globe visit the institute and it’s well equipped facilities in Ferry Reach, St. George’s to carry out their research.

One important aspect of the institute is the Marine Environmental Program (MEP) which ultimately provides management information to assist in protecting Bermuda’s marine environment. They study the trends and interactions of local and global effects such as pollution and coral bleaching in an effort to better understand the dynamic marine environment. One of the main tools in this effort is a VideoRay Pro 3 ROV they affectionately call “Snapper.” Because of its superior portability, affordability, and maneuverability over other ROV’s on the market, BIOS has embraced these characteristics and relies on the excellent video quality, the non-invasive nature of the submersible, and the minimal power consumption to conduct their research.

So far, the BIOS MEP scientists have examined sewer outfalls without exposing divers to the toxic nature of the sewage in the water, conducted visual surveys of the surrounding outer rim reef, and counted black groupers at spawning aggregations at depths of over 100’, a depth easily attainable by the VideoRay Pro 3 which is capable of reaching depths of 500’ (152m).